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Latest Audiobook Reviews

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Dark and Bawdy Romantic Comedy
Bound to End Badly, written by R. L. Tiochta, is a superb example of dark romantic comedy. Set in Derby (UK), and follows Peter and Maze as they stumble through the dating scene and ever so slowly towards each other. Tiochta gives us alternating glimpses into the lives of Peter and Maze, where something isn't quite right... and not just because there's a serial killer on the loose. For a story… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 26th of November, 2021

Sherlock in America
One Must Tell the Bees, by J. Lawrence Matthews, tells the story of a very young Sherlock Holmes before he was Sherlock. His brother Mycroft uses his influence to get young Holmes into a job in America. What follows is an exceptionally well-told tale weaved together with a history lesson around the end of the American civil war, the assassination of Abraham Lincoln, and the capture of John Wilkes Booth. The… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 24th of November, 2021

Robot Farts
This far into the Hard Luck Hank series, it's hard to review without feeling like I'm repeating myself. As always, time has moved on, and Belvaille has changed once again. The nobles are (mostly) gone, and the remaining inhabitants are scratching out a living in any way they can. Life in the Post Colmarian Confederation Colmarian Confederation (yes, that's the title of confederation now) is hard. New laws are being… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 19th of November, 2021

It's Glocken Time!
Continuing my journey of the Hard Luck Hank series in audiobook, next up was Stank Delicious. Each book in the series reinvents the world of Hank just a little. In this case, everything has moved on a few years since the events of the previous books. Nobles are bedded in even deeper into Belvaille, and Hank is scratching out a living once more as a go-between. Cliston, Hank's Dredel Led butler,… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 14th of November, 2021

A Humorous Romp
With a style reminiscent of classic cinematic British romps, Let the Swine Go Forth by Auriel Roe ably carries on that tradition. A story of a rather hapless headmaster in a (very) foreign land, leading a group of teachers that embody the seven deadly sins. Starting a new international school in a country run by a ruthless dictator... things were never going to be easy. Tristram Randolph takes the role of… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 9th of November, 2021

A Chimney Sweep, Her Golem, and a House of 100 Chimneys
I picked up Sweep - The Story of a Girl and Her Monster by Jonathan Auxier for a couple of reasons. One, the story sounded REALLY good, and two, I was looking for something that might appeal to my kids. The story of a chimney sweep and her golem set in London in the 1800s sounded too good to pass by, so I grabbed it and plugged in my earbuds. The… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 8th of November, 2021

A Menagerie of Monsters and Mayhem
Monster is the second book by A. Lee Martinez I've purchased in a few months, and I suspect I'll have more in my collection before long. In the mood for something monstery, I jumped into this Scooby-Doo style adventure where magic and monsters are real. Just most people don't tend to notice them. Judy is working the late shift at an out-of-the-way convenience store when a yeti appears in the freezer… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 5th of November, 2021

It's the End of the World... Again!
The Prince Has No Pants, written by Matthew Howry, has been sitting in my list of audiobooks to buy eventually for a while now, and when it came up in the 2-for-1 sale on Audible, I grabbed it plus a bunch of others I'd been mulling over. The premise is right smack in the types of books I've been enjoying recently, and after listening to it, I'm hoping to hear… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 1st of November, 2021

Fast-Paced Mayhem with the Night Shift
Much like the first books in the series, book 3 of the 24/7 Demon Mart, Angel Trouble by D.M. Guay, hardly pauses for a breath as Lloyd, DeeDee, and Kevin careen from one insane catastrophe to another. Massive props to the narrator too, who had to pronounce Zackumzaphielhermesiappotholonian multiple times. At least Guay cut him some slack and let the fallen Angel of Death (well, one of them) have a… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 30th of October, 2021

Hank Hangs on While the Station Gets Seriously Exclusive
After finishing book 3, it was straight onto book 4 of the Hard Luck Hank series - Suck My Cosmos. Belvaille has moved on yet again and is now moving towards an aristocracy. Hank only manages to still live there because he's the oldest living continuous citizen and the toffs seem to enjoy that. Assisted by the universes most sought-after butler, a Dredel Led (robot) named Cliston, Hank finds his… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 25th of October, 2021

Hank's Sheer Mass the Only Thing Holding Belvaille Together
I thought it about time I get back to the stack of Hard Luck Hank audiobooks I bought in one go and book three Hard Luck Hank: Prince of Suck by Steven Campbell is where I'm up to. I always find it easy to come back to ol' Hank and slip back into the universe as if I'd never left. Since the last book, a good three-quarters of a century has… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 23rd of October, 2021

An Online Prison of the Future
In Imprisoned Online (Gaming the System), written by P.A. Wikoff, the future of humankind looks rather bleak. In Wikoff's future, humans have nerfed the planet to the point where it's not safe to go outside without a breathing unit and a permit. They stay indoors, playing the next big computer game that comes along. A society that's a little reminiscent of Idiocracy, but sort of a cross where intelligent… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 20th of October, 2021

Fake It Till You Make It
How to Defeat a Demon King in Ten Easy Steps, is a short, fun litRPG written by Andrew Rowe that uses one of my favourite plot devices at the moment - that is unconventional methods of level and skills progression. Forget fighters, wizards, bards, or barbarians. Instead, we get a "Bag Mage", basically a class for merchants and couriers to carry stuff. Our hero, Yui Shaw, doesn't want to wait around… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 10th of October, 2021

Easy to Enjoy Humorous Fantasy
Two Necromancers, a Bureaucrat, and an Army of Golems, by L. G. Estrella, is the "publisher's pack" of the first two books in the Unconventional Heroes series. I feel it is aimed at a younger audience than the bracket I fall into, but that didn't stop me from enjoying it! These were a fun, easy to listen to pair of humorous fantasy books that follow the adventures of Grand Necromance Timothy… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 5th of October, 2021

Slow to Start, but Gets Good Quick
I picked up both books in the Tower of Babel series during a recent Audible sale on a bit of a whim. I was trawling through Reddit, looking for some recommendations when someone mentioned SpeedRunner, written by Adam Elliott. Without doing much more research than finding it, ten bucks later and both were in my library. Honestly, at first blush, I thought perhaps I'd made a mistake. The book started off… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 28th of September, 2021

Mythological Mash-up Mystery
Wyrd Gods, written by Susana Imaginario, contains more gods and minor deities than you can poke a stick at, and early on I realised I had to pay close attention or else I'd get lost. There's a lot going on, with Greek gods scheming against Norse gods, and vice-versa, with our heroine, Illena caught in the middle. Most of the story of Wyrd Gods (pronounced "weird" if you're wondering... means "fated')… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 26th of September, 2021

A Delightful Conclusion to a Great Trilogy
Between the Layers, written by Danielle Palli, is the third book of the Data Collectors trilogy in a series that took me by surprise in the first book and sucked me right into the world created by Palli. These books blend magic and sci-fi while still being very down to earth and are filled with such an interesting and unique cast of characters. In book three, Lucene and her pals deal… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 24th of September, 2021

Welcome to the Fifth Floor of the Dungeon
The Dungeon Crawler Carl books continue to keep me entertained, even after multiple re-listens. Book four - The Gate of the Feral Gods - is no different. The author Matt Dinniman continues to amaze me with how much sheer plot he can weave into a story while delivering unique situations on each level of the dungeon. Dinniman sprinkles in the clues throughout the story, with sometimes seemingly non-meaningful items having a… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 20th of September, 2021

Much Slower Than the First Two
Being a fan of the first two books in the Cinnamon Bun series by RavensDagger, I jumped at the chance of pre-ordering book three when it appeared on Audible. Still enjoyable but seemingly much slower than the first two while still being within the same ballpark for length. The story keeps going from where book two left off, with Broccoli, Amaryllis, and Awen heading to the Nesting Kingdom, home of Amaryllis,… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 19th of September, 2021

Fun, If a Little Predictable, Sci-fi Heist
I picked up Grand Theft Astro, written by Scott Meyer, for nothing as part of my Audible Plus subscription, and while the story was mostly enjoyable, I'm on the fence as to if I'd have enjoyed it knowing I'd spent a credit on it. The story follows the... allegedly... greatest thief of all time, Baird. Allegedly because that's all the cops have on her as she's quick to remind everyone. Infected… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 13th of September, 2021

Scorsese-esque Noir Gangster Thriller
Felonious Monk, written by William Kotzwinkle, is a touch of Scorsese-esque Goodfellas and Casino rolled up with something like hard-boiled, dark humour. If you're a fan of bodies being dropped at every opportunity, disposed of in interesting ways, including the old favourites mixed in with new-age hippie spiritual nonsense, then this book is for you. Tommy Martini is or rather was a monk. After accidentally killing someone, he retreated to Mexico… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 5th of September, 2021

A Great Addition to the Firefly Universe
While looking through what books were on Audible Plus, to my surprise, books 4 and 5 in the Firefly series popped up. Always happy to get more Firefly stories, so nabbed them both. In this one, Generations, written by Tim Lebbon, the established Firefly universe is expanded a little more as we learn about how the humans of the Earth that was packed up and moved out. This story focuses heavily… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 5th of September, 2021

Coming-of-age Adventure in Feudal Japan
Taro, written by Blue Spruell, is a reimagining of several Japanese folk tales featuring a young hero named Taro. I'll admit, I'm not familiar with any of the source material, so I've no idea how close or how much this leans into the original material. For me, this was an endearing young-adult adventure where warlords of feudal Japan are battling for control of the country. Rescued from certain death by a… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 31st of August, 2021

Grimdark Fantasy
Silent Hunters, a Warhammer 40,000 book written by Edoardo Albert, is a dark story filled with atrocities committed by some seriously messed-up aliens, a story of redemption for a Chaplain of the Carcharodons Astra, and a story of hope for a slave and her son. The story itself is fairly well split between the Carcharodon's hunt for an ancient relict, a slab of void glass of unknown power, and of the… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 28th of August, 2021

If Wall Street Took Over a DnD Setting
Orconomics: A Satire, written by J. Zachary Pike, lives up to its title! A humorous satire of orc, dwarves, elves and other fantasy folks in a world where the world of heroes and monsters is being run into the ground by large corporations. I struggled, initially, to get into this book, but the longer I listened, the more it sucked me in, to the point I was fully engrossed by the… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 25th of August, 2021

A Title I Couldn't Pass By
Emperor Mollusk Versus the Sinister Brain, written by A. Lee Martinez, is probably one of the more interesting titled books I've read in a while. I kept reading good things about Martinez, so I thought I'd jump onto this one during a recent two-for-one sale Audible was running. While not as laugh-out-loud as I thought the story would be, it's a solid story sitting well in the pulpish style of humorous… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 16th of August, 2021

Horror Comedy Leaning Heavily on the Comedy
24/7 Demon Mart, written by D.M. Guay is off-the-wall nuts. It's virtually non-stop crazy situations happening to poor protagonist Lloyd Wallace. He's a slacker, a loser, up to his eyeballs in debt with no aspirations beyond drinking slushies, playing Xbox and masturbating. He is oblivious to much of what is going on around him, even once he finds out the truth of the 24/7 Dairy Mart and the strange goings-on.… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 11th of August, 2021

Welcome to Warhammer 40,000
Nightbringer - The Chronicles of Uriel Ventris, written by Graham McNeill, was my first experience in the Warhammer 40,000 universe, and I have got to say, I enjoyed the heck out of it. I knew of it as a tabletop game that used miniatures and involved space marines, but that was the extent of what I knew. As it turned out, it's been around for decades and not only has a… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 6th of August, 2021

Solid Dystopian Story
The Outlands, written by Tyler Edwards, is a decent dystopian/post-apocalyptic story set in the future where humans now live in giant walled cities under a protective dome to keep out the toxins and the other nasties outside their walls. Only a handful exist, like the megacities idea in Judge Dredd, and each apparently specialising in something (kind of like Hunger Games), although we spend all of the book inside Dios. Jett… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 3rd of August, 2021

A Little Underwhelming
They Called Me Mad, written by J Pal, is a humorous litRPG story set in the "real world" where aliens have landed and have turned planet Earth into a reality TV series. Being in the same vein as Dungeon Crawler Carl, I thought I'd enjoy this book a lot more than I did. Yes, the story was fun, but I never had the sense any of the characters were in any… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 31st of July, 2021

Gods Behaving Badly
Keymaker's Daughter, written by Anya Stassiy, is an interesting urban fantasy with the gods of ancient Greece as the theme. A tad slow to start off but stick with it and you'll be rewarded with a story with heroes and heroines to root for as they try to save the world. Aurora, daughter of a famous lock maker, is drawn into the scheming of the gods when her father mysteriously vanishes… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 24th of July, 2021

Another Fun Holmes and Watson Adventure
The Case of the Haunted Haunted House, written by Drew Hayes, is the second book in the 5-Minute Sherlock series featuring Sherman Holmes and Joel Watson. This book was a lot more "mystery" orientated than the first. Fair enough, the first book set the world and its characters in play, an origin story of sorts. This book, though, got into the typical Doyle style of a mystery to solve. And… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 18th of July, 2021

A Delightful Fantasy Fairytale
Evertrue, written by Jill London, is a feel-good fairytale adventure. Now, I'll admit to having help reviewing this one. I enlisted my youngest daughter to listen along with me. I knew without even asking that she enjoyed it. Giggling away as the story unfolded, she was hooked on it. Even though it's short at a little over an hour and a half, we had to listen over a number of sittings.… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 13th of July, 2021

BYO Tin Foil Hat
The Urban Legion, written by Dave Agans, pulls together about every urban legend you've ever heard of (and some you probably haven't) into a conspiracy-nuts ultimate fantasy. In this book, Agans world is one where all those legends have a basis in truth, but cartels (such as the truffle cartel) are working to keep it all suppressed. This wasn't a bad story, but it did seem to wander around a lot… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 9th of July, 2021

Plus 1 Adorable
Stuff and Nonsense (Threadbare #1), written by Andrew Seiple, is a tale of a little toy golem trying to be the best teddy bear friend to his little girl that he can be. This entirely charming innocent teddy bear golem starts life with underdeveloped int stats but better than average wisdom. He learns quick and his stats climb up unnoticed by his creator or most anyone around him. He befriends… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 5th of July, 2021

RNGesus Take the Wheel
Rule of Cool, written by Matthew Siege, is a fun romp along with the "bad guys", in this case, the lowly NPCs of Gearblins (and a few other races but the main characters are Gearblins). As you can expect, the NPCs are none too happy with their lot in life. Unable to fight back, back talk, or even dream. Raze is the protagonist of the story. Chained to a desk in… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 29th of June, 2021

More Hard Luck Hank Fun
Hard Luck Hank: Basketful of Crap, written by Steven Campbell, is the second book in the Hard Luck Hank series and continues the misadventures of poor old Hank. The space station Belvaille has changed a lot since the first book, thanks to the deal Hank worked out. Gone are the gangs, mostly. Those that are left are fighting for the scraps now the galactic corporations have taken over and using the… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 26th of June, 2021

A Long Time Favorite
Hard Luck Hank: Screw the Galaxy, written by Steven Campbell, is a series of humorous science fiction books that I've enjoyed (in Kindle format) for a long time. Up until the recent Audible sale, I'd resisted buying them as an audiobook because I couldn't quite reconcile the voice of Hank with the character I'd built up in my head over the years. I'm still having difficulty, but it'd been too long… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 25th of June, 2021

Magic Comes to the Bayou
The Lost Art of Magic, written by John Kovacich, is a coming of age story set (mostly) in the swamps of Louisiana and tells the story of Destiny Boutin, a young girl who lives with her nana. Her family has a long, rich heritage of being descended from witches from long ago, with only the faintest hints of magic ability now left. The book opens with a bang, where Destiny is… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 23rd of June, 2021

Save the World or Die Trying (Repeatedly)
Mid-Lich Crisis, written by Steve Thomas, is a tale of a Darruk, a lich (basically an undead mage) with a single, somewhat noble pursuit of saving the world through any means necessary. Unfortunately, he's constantly thwarted at every opportunity by his arch-nemesis, a barbarian intent on repeatedly killing Darruk. This was an enjoyable story, maybe not as funny as I thought it was going to be but a good listen overall.… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 20th of June, 2021

Wilderness Thriller
In the Forest of the Lost and Found, written by K.D. Van Brunt is a wilderness survival thriller with some (at first) rather unlikeable characters. Allyssa Baylor, her younger sister Grace and younger brother Nick all reluctantly leave their privileged suburban lifestyle for a week worth of camping in the middle of nowhere. Most of the characters, Allyssa (Allie) in particular are initially hard to bond with. They are the epitome… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 18th of June, 2021

I Couldn't Get Through This
Exterminate All the Brutes, written by Sven Lindqvist, is no doubt an important story that needs to be told, but I couldn't get past around chapter 25. The audio production is completely un-edited, filled with tripped up words, long pauses, multiple retakes, and other things that should have been edited out before publishing. The narrator, Melissa Todd, has a pleasant voice to listen to but has been severely let down by… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 17th of June, 2021

Great Story - Terrible Narration
Dreadnought, written by April Daniels, revolves around fifteen-year-old Danny Tozer in a city where being a superhero is a legitimate job possibility. Designated at birth as male, Danny knows this is a mistake. She wants nothing more than to shed the life she has and live her life as it was meant to be. Her wish, of course, is granted, and so begins her journey. Note - part of this… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 15th of June, 2021

Fun Fun with the Bun Bun
Cinnamon Bun: Volume 2, written by RavensDagger, continues the adventures of Brocolli Bunch and Amaryllis as they make, well, Brocolli makes, friends of everyone she encounters, and blissfully making her way through the world. This was a no-brainer for me after how much fun the first book was. In this book, the due becomes a trio with the addition of Awen, a shy human girl who needs to escape the clutches… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 13th of June, 2021

Resurrectionists of 1850s New York
The Impossible Girl, written by Lydia Kang, set in 1850s New York, where medical science is advancing thanks to the study of cadavers. Unfortunately, these are hard to come by legitimately, and here we find Cora Lee and her band of resurrectionists - grave robbers by any other name. Cora lives a double life out of necessity. Not only are cadavers useful for medical study, but an entirely second industry is… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 11th of June, 2021

Loads of Sherlock Inspired Fun
The Case of the Damaged Detective, written by Drew Hayes, is a fun new take on homages to Sherlock Holmes. There have been plenty in the past, and no doubt more in the future. This one sees a man, Sherman Holmes, who believes himself to be a descendent of the fictional detective. He has no memory of who he used to be, but he's damn sure he's now the worlds greatest… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 8th of June, 2021

A Love Note to Firefly
Galaxy Outlaws, written by J. S. Morin, is unashamedly a love note to the TV show Firefly (cancelled too soon!) but not so much that you feel cheated or like it's fan fiction. Instead, what we get is an interesting take on the universe where magic and machines play a big part... and don't always play nicely together. While the blurb pegs Carl as the main character, it's hard to pin… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 7th of June, 2021

Couldn't Get Into It
Try as I might, I just couldn't get into Call Numbers by Syntell Smith. Set in mid-nineties New York, this book failed to hold any real interest for me. There were a few times where I thought it was picking up, but it never quite got there. I want to give it the benefit of the doubt. I honestly don't think it was a terrible written story overall, but it… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 7th of June, 2021

Wholesome, Fun, and Absolutely Engaging
Cinnamon Bun, written by RavensDagger is a light, wholesome LitRPG adventure of a teenage girl named Broccoli Bunch who finds herself in a new world where monsters, level-ups, and dungeons crawls are a thing. I couldn’t but love the character of Broccoli. She’s an eternal optimist, seeing the best in everyone and every situation – even those that are trying hard to kill her. After accepting the quest invitation to help… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 3rd of June, 2021

Weird and Hilarious
Death Gets a Book, written by Frank J Edler, is probably the weirdest book I've had the pleasure of listening to in a while. The story revolves around Vincent Death, the latest Grim Reaper to get recruited, after dying horribly at a genuine Tijuana donkey show. If you don't know what that is... well, engage "incognito" mode before Googling it. What follows is a hilarious tale of life after death for… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 29th of May, 2021

Great Take on Dungeon Core
Bunker Core, written by Andrew Seiple, is a bit of a different take on your typical dungeon core style books that tend to be in the more D&D style setting. This merges the dungeon core setting with advanced tech in a post-apocalyptic Earth. Wynne, the core, wakes to find his bunker is under attack. With only another AI, Argus, to help him work out what is going on and how to… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 18th of May, 2021

Twisted Action and Carnage with Plenty of Laughs
The Dungeon Anarchist's Cookbook, written by Matt Dinniman is the third audiobook in the Dungeon Crawler Carl series, and I snatched this the second I saw it drop on Audible. I've re-listened to the first two a couple of times each now to help fill the void while waiting for the next book. In this book, Carl, Donut, and new teammate Katia find themselves on the fourth floor of the dungeon,… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 17th of May, 2021

Reminiscent of Old-School Sci-Fi
Alien Safari, written by Robert Appleton, had me thinking of old-school pulp sci-fi space adventure style books. Nothing too complicated, but a decent plot, the hard-boiled tough-as-nails main character, alien worlds, murder, and political maneuverings. Like old-school sci-fi, the hero came with a solid helping of misogynistic attitude and a damsel in distress who was often simultaneously extremely competent in what she was doing while being helpless and in need… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 11th of May, 2021

More Great Fun
Dark & Day 2: The Withering Mark written by Jacob Israel Grey finds us in a world trying to recover from the events in book 1. Some seeds of distrust are still around, but generally, everyone is trying to get along and put their past prejudices behind them. This book felt a little slower than the first book, at least until the action kicked up a notch. At that point, I… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 7th of May, 2021

Top Notch Disturbing Crime Thriller
The Art of Dying - A Ray Hanley Crime Thriller - written by Derik Cavignano was both disturbing and thoroughly enjoyable to listen to. A twisted serial killer is on the loose, disfiguring the victims... the first you meet early on that sets the tone for what's coming. Intertwined with this is a brewing Irish vs Italian Mafia war. Set on the mean streets of Boston, this is a gritty crime… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 28th of April, 2021

Carl Kicks It Up A Notch
Carl's Doomsday Scenario, book 2 of the Dungeon Crawler Carl series written by Matt Dinniman is equally as enjoyable and all-out nuts as the first book... and I love it. It's been a long time since I stumbled upon a series I knew from the get-go that without question, I'd be into for a long, long time. Matt Dinniman delivers a hell of a follow up to book 1, adding the… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 27th of April, 2021

A New Spin on an Old Tale
Brandon Thighmaster and Some Other Guys, written by Steve Wetherell and EM Kaplan is the second book of the adventures of Brandon Thighmaster. It's part of the larger Authors and Dragons podcast universe, but being familiar with the podcast isn't a prerequisite for understanding what's happening in the books... though it might explain a few things for you! There is little (if any) connection between the first book (The… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 24th of April, 2021

Pirate and LitRPG - Great Mix
Limitless Seas, by Dean Henegar, is book 1 in the new Limitless Lands series. I admit I haven't read any of the Limitless Lands series, but that didn't really hamper my understanding of what was going on. It's easy enough to pick up and get right into. Short world-setting at the beginning is enough to get the gist. This book was a lot of fun to listen to. After the first… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 21st of April, 2021

Like a Warm Hug From a Loved One
Breach of Contract, written by Danielle Palli, is book 2 in The Data Collectors series, and I enjoyed the story about as much as I did in the first book. Most of the characters you'll meet in this story feel warm and genuine, and meeting them again was like meeting a bunch of old friends. Much of the story involves the political wranglings of varied species trying to take over the… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 15th of April, 2021

Gritty Mystery on the Streets of LA
The Seven O'Clock Man, written by Justin DiPego, is a raw, gritty, hard-boiled mystery set on LA's streets. A killer known only as the Seven O'Clock Man is beating to death the homeless living on Skid Row. The Seven O'Clock Man, the bogeyman of the homeless. A figure invented to explain the occasional murders that nobody outside of the tramps themselves really cared about... but now suddenly real as the mysterious… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 8th of April, 2021

No Lie - This Kept Me Guessing
Sleeping Dogs Lie, written by Samantha Downing, is a short mystery/thriller where a lovable dog-walker named Shelby is suddenly thrust into the middle of a criminal investigation when she discovers the dog's owner murdered in his own bathroom. Downing delivered a masterclass in short-story telling, with not a word wasted as the mystery unfolded. Shelby is a character you just have to sympathise with. She has a particular zest for life… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 7th of April, 2021

A Well-crafted Adventure of Mecha and Magic
Dark & Day 1, written by Jacob Israel Grey is an engaging story marrying a number of genres together to make a story I had a hard time pushing pause on when life said I had to do other things. It's written at a level similar to the early Harry Potter novels (more on this later), where even though it could easily be enjoyed by children, adults will find a… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 3rd of April, 2021

Good Story - Whiffed the Ending
The (Sort of) Dark Mage, book 1 of the Waldo Rabbit series by Nelson Chereta had me, right up until the ending, which it completely whiffed. Not a "Game of Thrones season 8" level whiff, but enough of one to have me seriously considering if I should bother continuing with the series at all. First off, the book just ends. No big build-up with a massive payoff, no stakes being raised,… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 28th of March, 2021

Infuriatingly Hard To Stop Listening To
The Phoenix Project written by Gene Kim, Kevin Behr and George Spafford was, for me, infuriatingly hard to stop listening to. Reading the cover, you'd think it'd be a rather dry book about an IT department struggling to meet impossible targets and deadlines. You'd be half right. It's compellingly written, though, so I couldn't help but get sucked into the drama, the chaos, and had me rooting for the IT guys… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 22nd of March, 2021

Couldn't Get Into It
All things being equal, The Sky Above by A.G.R. Goff sounded like it'd be right up my alley. Post-apocalyptic sci-fi generally appeals to me... but this I couldn't get into. There wasn't anything particularly "wrong" with the story as such, but I found I really didn't care about the characters. After a religion-fuelled war that sees nukes detonated in major cities, two friends come together in a bid to survive what… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 16th of March, 2021

Sweet Bedtime Story
The Adventure of Sleepy Bear, written by Daphne A. Knight, is short and sweet - just what you want for a bedtime story! A relaxing tale with a message for the kids about a bear who can't fall asleep without a treasured stuffed animal. I played this at bedtime to my daughter (7), and I assume she loved it - she fell asleep right before... well, that would be spoilers! Right… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 10th of March, 2021

Good but Fell Short
War Girls by Tochi Onyebuchi left me in two minds. On one hand, it was a decent story well told. On the other, it just felt like it fell short of pulling me in as much as I thought it should have. That sounds paradoxical, but after waiting a day and thinking on it, it's still how I feel. At first, I wasn't sure if I'd even get through it. It… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 6th of March, 2021

Comedy Gold - Fantastic Writing and Performance
Dungeon Crawler Carl, written by Matt Dinniman, is now sitting comfortably inside the list of my all-time favourite books. Those that I go back to, time and time again. This was my first listen, but I already know I'll be coming back again and again. This was a perfect blend of dungeon crawl litRPG and bonkers humour. Fair warning - this book isn't for the easily offended. F-bombs are dropped, carpet-bombed… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 26th of February, 2021

A Story That Will Stick in My Mind
Horseshoes and Hand Grenades by S. M. Stevens is a novel that will likely stick in my mind for years to come. There's a lot of situations in this book that make you uncomfortable, as so they should. The subjects it covers are hard to read about, but they're important to experience nonetheless. The main characters are two very different personas, with chapters alternating between their viewpoints. Astrid comes across mostly… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 21st of February, 2021

Time Travel That Works
Last Year by Robert Charles Wilson is one I've had hanging around my list since I picked it up during a 2-for-1 sale a while ago. The premise intrigued me to give it a go, as sci-fi and time travel is something that usually gets my attention. In this novel, we get around all the pesky issues with time travel such as the grandfather paradox and the like. When travelling back… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 15th of February, 2021

Different, Quirky, and Fun
The Data Collectors written by Danielle Palli I can most easily describe as different, quirky, and fun. The blurb doesn't really do the storyline justice, even though it does a decent job of describing it. I know that sounds paradoxical, but give the story a go and see if you disagree. The concept is interesting and well-executed. Earth of the near-future where aliens walk among us, to the general distrust of… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 11th of February, 2021

Got Me Sentimental About a Place I've Never Been
Annie Crow Knoll: Sunrise by Gail Priest, admittedly is in a genre I rarely find myself reading, but has now got me thinking that's an oversight if the stories are as warm, pleasant, and sentimental as this. Starting in the summer of 1955, we take a meandering trip through life with Annie "Crow" Atkinson as she grows up on the knoll - an out-of-the-way place run by her parents where… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 5th of February, 2021

PKD Showing His Brilliance
Time Out of Joint by Philip K. Dick, originally published back in 1959, still holds up surprisingly well today. Like a lot of PKD stories he skillfully spins a tale that you can't help but get sucked into. Intriguing happenings, weird out-of-place things that are somehow totally at home in the story. The story itself revolves around Ragle Gumm, who lives with his sister and brother-in-law and earns his keep by… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 1st of February, 2021

Exploring Moral Dilemmas with AI
The Robot's Decision by David Gwyther expounds an idea that humankind is in the midst of coming to terms with, and will need to come to terms with as the race towards stronger AI and self-driving vehicles becomes the norm. Set in the future where humankind is expanding rapidly throughout the universe by using technology to temporarily rewrite time and space. This is not without its consequences, which humans have found… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 29th of January, 2021

Superb Story You Must Experience for Yourself
The Light at Midnight by Tom Reppert is, in a word, superb. I'm not a student of history. It never was a strong suit of mine at school, and when given a chance, I dropped it in favour of a different class. That said, I'm not ignorant of the atrocities of the second world war, but even still I was unprepared what lay within this book. This is a masterfully crafted… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 25th of January, 2021

Captivating Scottish Mythology Tale
Outsider: A Forbidden Island Short Story by Lianne Simon is a short story set on Eilean nan Sìthean, a remote island of Scotland forgotten about by the rest of the world. I'm not going to pretend to even think about spelling any of the Gaelic words (except for the few I've picked up looking inside the ebook version), but it's a beautiful story of a young fairy named Màiri who… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 16th of January, 2021

Classic 50s Sci-Fi Mind-Swapping Fun
Immortality, Inc. by Robert Sheckley is another classic sci-fi that's been on my list for a while and have only just got around to reading. I'm on a bit of a nostalgic kick at the moment, and this one fits right in. The future of 2110 as imagined in the 50s. Mind swapping, indeed, mind-stealing is now commonplace. The afterlife is now a certainty... if you can afford it, of course.… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 14th of January, 2021

Left Me Wanting More
The Man in the Maze by Robert Silverberg is certainly a product of its time. Manly men cavorting across the universe with women there for decoration and to have sex with. If you can get past all that, you're left with a fairly decent sci-fi story that I wish had more... well, more story. It's a fairly straight forward story - a mysterious maze as old as time kills anyone who… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 9th of January, 2021

Gilligan's Island Meets Porky's Cranked to Eleven
Sex, Lies and the Bomb by Anthony Vincent Bruno left me speechless. Absolutely mind blown by the end. After finishing this book, I looked through his other works and found them to be the polar opposite of his humorous end-of-the-world tale, so he's an astonishingly clever writer. We start with the incredibly misogynistic Eddie Coltrane as he laments his fate, assuming he's going to get kneecapped by loan sharks in the… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 3rd of January, 2021

Expertly Weaving the Past and Future Together
The Stone Canal by Ken Macleod is book 2 of "The Fall Revolution" series, and one I've read in paperback and Kindle form and now experienced in its audio form. The books in this series, starting with The Star Fraction (previous review), are some of my all-time favorites that frequently get another reading. Of the three, this is probably my favorite. MacLeod expertly weaves together a backstory for a minor… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 31st of December, 2020

A Golden Age of Sci-Fi Classic
Little Fuzzy by H. Beam Piper has been languishing in my "to-read" list for quite some time. I found it just after Audible announced the Audible Plus catalog so I could pick it up for no extra credits, but because of this, it's been sitting in the pile just waiting to get picked. I should not have waited so long! This was truly a slice of sci-fi excellence from the golden… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 28th of December, 2020

A Short Taste of Dystopian Sci-Fi
The Burning by Wayne Kyle Spitzer was an intriguing listen, albeit one I found a little hard to follow. I had suspected as much after reading the blurb because the stories are set in an established world which I was unfamiliar with. The premise is quite interesting though, and I'd love to see a full-length story set in this world. I assume the other books in the series explain some… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 22nd of December, 2020

Maybe You Had to Be There?
The blurb for "Mind the Gap in Zip-It Socks" by Patricia A Steele made it seem like this would be a fun story to listen to... but it fell flat. Like sitting down and listening to your grandma recount her vacation piece by piece. While probably a highlight of their life, this story just has a lot of "guess you had to be there" moments. The travellers are possibly the most… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 22nd of December, 2020

Engaging LitRPG with a Dark Side
Author Terra Snover pitched "Another Online: All Hail the Queen" to me as "Wreck-it Ralph meets Handmaid's Tale" and I was in, no questions. A brilliant elevator pitch if ever I heard one, but also rather accurate. I enjoyed every second of this story. Snover's bio says she grew up loving video games and RPGs, and you can feel that throughout this story. The story sucked me right in, to the… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 18th of December, 2020

Messed Up - Funny Though
Dodgeball High by Bradley Sands is like Dodgeball (the movie) and the Pretty Fly (For a White Guy) song had a messed up love child raised on gore movies. Everything is about Justin and his new life is all dodgeball. Imagine someone who loved the moving Dodgeball, and wanted a world centred around the game even more. Not just a sport, but a way of life and a means to… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 11th of December, 2020

The Best Satirical Look at Modern Society
QualityLand, by Marc-Uwe Kling. Where you can only talk in superlatives. Where machines don't make mistakes. A world where who you are is governed by algorithms who know you better than you know yourself... or do they? This book takes a long, hard look at who we are as a society, how much we give over control of our information to big business and shines a harsh, bright light on… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 7th of December, 2020

Not Bad, But Wasn't For Me
I had a bit of a hard time getting into The Soulkind Awakening by Steve Davala. I'm not sure if it's the writing style or what, but something about it had me wanting to move on to something else. I kept with it for a bit, then listened to something else, then came back to it. Overall, the story is decent but nothing that made me think it really stood out… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 30th of November, 2020

Murderously Good Story
A quick confession - I only glanced at the blurb before I picked up Dance with the Reaper by Wes Markin, and jumped right in. Turns out, it's book 5 of a series, but I pushed on ahead regardless as any series like this should be able to stand alone well enough without needing to read the priors. And it delivered in spades. I quickly got up to speed with who… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 30th of November, 2020

Matilda Meets The Addams Family
I can best describe The Weirdies by Michael Buckley as "Matilda meets The Addams Family". This was an absolute delight, reminiscent of the great Roald Dahl with horrid characters, horrible things going on that are seemingly normal, and an overall rollicking good time. I grabbed this (admittedly) children's book because I was looking for something that I'd perhaps be able to use to get my kids into audiobooks (I'm still working… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 26th of November, 2020

A Classic You MUST Listen To
For some reason, The Martian Chronicles by Ray Bradbury was one that always slipped me by. When the opportunity came up to grab it as part of a 2-for-1 deal a while back I jumped at it without even listening to the sample. And boy, am I glad I finally got to experience this masterpiece! Bradbury paints such a unique picture of life on Mars for the new colonists and depicts… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 26th of November, 2020

Love in the Time of Telepresence
Bunn-O by Kate Tighe-Pigott is a short, engaging story of a family, a world apart but trying to remain connected through technology. On one side, the husband, a major tech geek, enlists the help of grad student to build a telepresence device out of a plastic toy bunny. The wife (and narrator) of the story is initially on board, but as the weeks and months drag on becomes ever isolated and… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 23rd of November, 2020

Fun Steampunk Action Adventure
Steampunk is one of those genres I never really found myself that taken with. I like the idea of it, but I think it always seemed... I dunno, too hipster or something. I took a gamble on this since it featured a heroine who intrigued me - a reformed cat burglar going straight forced back into the life she left behind. All five Nyssa Glass adventures by H. L. Burke are… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 22nd of November, 2020

An Interesting Look Into What We Don't See
Written by Dennis John Woods, Black Flag Journals was an interesting look into what we don't see and don't hear about. The format is of Woods' war journals, written over the course of his multiple tours of Iraq and Afghanistan. The style of writing fits the image I have of Woods, and I guess military personnel in general in that the vast majority of sentences are written in a direct, no-nonsense… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 17th of November, 2020

Action-packed Mayhem Through Zombie Wasteland
Billed as "Fast and the Furious meets World War Z" I knew I had to read this. Z Heist by George S. Mahaffey Jr was a lot of fun, although I'm not sure how much F&F I would say that I saw in it. Action-packed though? Sure was! World-building was solid, and a different take on Zombies in a world that has collapsed after the outbreak. The story launches us into… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 14th of November, 2020

Mad Scientists Galore!
As the title says, there are mad scientists galore in this fun science fiction story by David Spicer of AI gone... well, exactly as you'd expect. Roscoe, the eccentric CEO of a gigantic robotics manufacturer decides to set up a think-tank in the middle of the desert. No rules, no explanations, just brainiacs allowed a free hit at whatever they want to build. Out of this, there are two successes.… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 10th of November, 2020

Enjoyable and Heartfelt
The Messengers, an original sci-fi drama by Lindsay Joelle might be short on run time but it's big on experience. Told from two different times, we're introduced to a galaxy where there is much distrust among the different races. It's billed as a dark comedy, but I'm not sure I'd agree with that. Yes, one of the characters seems a bit too dense to have lived as long as he has,… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 10th of November, 2020

Compelling Beginning to a Saga
The Golden Princess, written by Brian Braden, is book zero of the Chronicles of Fu Xi. I wasn't familiar with the series prior to listening to this, but feel if the rest of the series is as richly intense and thought out as this prequel, then it's certainly one I'll find myself diving into again. Braden has delivered a world simultaneous from the distant past of mankind yet also very different,… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 7th of November, 2020

Unstoppable Suspense and an Original Story
I picked up The Stone Man by Luke Smitherd as part of a two-for-one deal that popped up when it was time to spend a credit. I'd never heard of this author before but was intrigued enough by the blurb and the sample that I knew right away I had to get it. This was some masterful storytelling. Slow burning, yet fast-paced when it needed to it. Trickles of details and… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 4th of November, 2020

Interesting Concepts, Good Story, Painfully Slow Narration
The Genesis Code by Lisa von Biela is one of those books that gets let down a lot by the narrator choice. The narrator, Daniel Dorse, is no doubt good at what he does, but his pace was painfully slow and almost monotone throughout. The story itself is solid. At first, I was reminded of one I'd read years ago by Max Barry called Company where the company was a shell… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 1st of November, 2020

An Intense and Self-Destructive Love Story
In Massive, Charlie Josephine delivers an intensely burning, dramatic, and raw love story that launches seconds after you click the play button and doesn't let up. The description said to experience with headphones (I do this anyway) and I'd certainly encourage any listeners to do so. There's a lot to take in and you don't want to miss a thing. During the time I'd set aside to listen, I lay… Read More
Reviewed by: Morgan Hobbes
Reviewed on: 30th of October, 2020

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